Responsibilities of Owning an Exotic Snake


By, Crystal S. Kauffman, Staff Writer

©Unknown

©Unknown

The Burmese Python and other exotic snakes have been getting bad press coverage lately in South Florida. I have decided to investigate the actual meaning of being a responsible owner of one of these exotic snakes. I found many interesting websites, which can educate a new snake owner. These snakes need special types of housing and care, so the new owner must be prepared to accommodate their growing needs.
Knowledge is Power

Before buying the snake, a person needs to consider the expenses associated with buying these exotic animals. The animal will require veterinarian care, special housing, live animals, and so much more as they grow. Take time to study and know what type of snake that you are interested in owning. Many new snake owners buy the snake as a baby and don’t realize how big they can become. In the right conditions and housing, these exotic snakes can grow to an enormous size and length.

Veterinarian Care

Every year or so, the snake will need a check-up or other medical care, but emergencies will pop up from Time to time as well. Take time, before purchasing a snake and find a vet that is able to treat reptiles like snake and lizards. Not every veterinarian will offer this type of care, but the potential snake owner should look around for a local vet that offers this specialized care. Ask other reptile owners and pet shop personnel about the veterinarian that tends to their reptiles.

Special Housing

The snake will need an escape proof wooden cage that will allow the snake to grow for several years before having to be replaces. Most people build their own reptile enclosure, but they must be sure to consult a reptile cage building website before attempting to build one. An owner should never use a standard fish aquarium for housing, because the snake can escape once it grows bigger and stronger. The snake should have clean housing as well, in order to keep the snake from getting sick.

Live Animals

Snakes will eat small animals several times a week, but the amount will be based on their size and weight. They eat live rabbit and rats, which can cost the owner a lot of money after they begin to grow larger. These animals can be purchased at a local pet shop, but some snake owner breed their own small animals to cut the cost down. However, if an owner is squeamish they may not be able to handle feeding the snake live animals.

Conclusion

Exotic snake require special care, as well as a responsible owner who can give them the proper care that they need. The potential snake owner should do his or her homework and interact with other snake owners. The snake will need the new owner to provide proper medical care, escape-proof housing, and live animals for the snake to stay healthy. However, this type of care can get expensive, so before making the purchase the potential snake owner should weigh the cost.
References:

Personal Knowledge

©2011, Crystal S. Kauffman

Burmese Python: South Florida’s New Threat


By, Crystal S. Kauffman, Staff Writer

©WCTV

©WCTV

The neighborhood residents in South Florida are facing a potential threat, which is roaming their neighborhoods. This new threat has residents that are living in fear of an exotic snake species that is called the Burmese Python. The National Wildlife Federation (2009), believes that these snakes were once pets, which became too big for their owners to handle. After being released in the wild, these abandoned pets began growing and rapidly reproducing.

Dangerous Neighbor

However, throughout the years, the snake population has expanded into the southeastern region of the United States. Now, experts believe that these snakes are becoming a major threat to the endangered species living in this habitat. No one is safe from this threat, since this species of snake can grow to over “20 ft” and weigh in at about “200lbs”. Each resident of South Florida are at risk of attack, even inside their own homes.

Population Expands

According to the Clark (2009), these enormous snakes have already invaded the Key West area. Now, officials are “warning residents” and establishing a “hotline” for residents to call when they spot one. These giant ambush predators are on the hunt for a meal, so residents must closely supervise their animals and children. These monstrous snakes can hide under a bed or inside of a closet, while waiting patiently to ambush their unsuspecting prey.

Northern Bound

Nevertheless, if something doesn’t change, these giant snakes will continue moving north. They will move to marshy lands, as they hunt for more food as they population continues to expand. According to NFW (2009), Florida’s officials have established ways for residents to protect themselves from these snakes. However, it is vital for South Florida’s residents to be cautious and protect themselves from these giant snakes.

Changes Needed

Some southern cities are training volunteers and hiring professionals to help capture these massive snakes. Homeowner’s are even trying to make sure their home is snake resistant, by leaving them no place to hide. Furthermore, parents and pet owners should also take precaution against these giant predators. This type of proactive attitude will help keep your loved ones safe, while officials work tirelessly to solve this expanding threat.

Conclusion

In conclusion, South Florida’s is facing new threats, as this massive bohemian began expanding into the surrounding areas. Fortunately, officials have warned residents about this giant predator. If something isn’t done soon, this new threat will begin ambushing those victims in its quest to find food. Therefore, officials and residents are fighting back, while becoming proactive against these invaders.

References:

Clark, C. (2009) When snakes invade, call the wranglers
Retrieved on February 28th, 2009 from the World Wide Web
http://m.miamiherald.com/mh/db_503/contentdetail.htm;jsessionid=FB420B25FB38774856136CF08867091F?contentguid=6bxEWjKB&storycount=3&detailindex=2&full=true

National Wildlife Foundation (2009) Everglade Invasion
Retrieved on February 28th, 2009 from the World Wide Web
http://www.nwf.org/NationalWildlife/article.cfm?issueID=127&articleID=1683

©2009, Crystal S. Kauffman

Previously Published